Scientific studies and reports showing harm to testosterone from EMF exposure

Biological and morphological effects on the reproductive organ of rats after exposure to electromagnetic field (2005); Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Suleyman Demirel University; Saudi Medical Journal

Subject Exposure
Adult male rats 2/3G mobile phones, 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks


The diameter of the seminiferous tubules and the mean height of the germinal epithelium were significantly decreased in the EMF group and there was a significant decrease in serum total testosterone levels in the EMF group.

Influence of 50 Hz magnetic field on sex hormones and other fertility parameters of adult male rats (2005)Department of Physics, University of UAE; Bioelectromagnetics

Subject Exposure
Adult male rats 50Hz sinusoidal magnetic field (e.g. near power lines) at approximately 25 µT for 18 weeks


In the exposed group, the weights of seminal vesicles and preputial glands were significantly reduced in the exposed group. There was a significant increase in the serum levels of male luteinizing hormone, while testosterone levels were significantly decreased only after 6 and 12 weeks. These results suggest that long term exposure to low frequency radiation could have adverse effects on mammalian fertility and reproduction.

The effects of an electromagnetic field on the boundary tissue of the seminiferous tubules of the rate: A light and transmission electron microscope study (2006); Folia morphologica

Subject Exposure
Adult male rats 50Hz sinusoidal magnetic field (e.g. near power lines) at approximately 25 µT for 18 weeks

In the exposed group, boundary tissue was found disrupted at various layers. The tissue showed infoldings, which were perhaps due to the loss of collagen and reticular fibrils from the inner and outer non-cellular layers. The outer non-cellular layer, which was thinner than that of the control, was stripped away from the myoid cell layer in multiple regions, giving a "blister-like" appearance. The myoid cells showed fewer polyribosomes, pinocytotic vesicles and glycogen granules. Most mitochondria were found to lack cristae. The connections between individual myoid cells were apparently lost. These results suggest that EMF exposure may cause profound changes in the boundary tissue of the seminiferous tubules. Therefore exposure to EMF may result in pathological changes that lead to subfertility and infertility. Of particular note, there were signs of recovery in the boundary tissue following withdrawal from EMF exposure.