Scientific studies and reports showing harm to fertility from EMF exposure

The effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on sperm function (2016)American Center for Reproductive Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar, Department of Urology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Faculty of Dentistry, MAHSA University; Arab Journal of Urology

Subject Exposure
Meta-analysis of 27 studies various EMF

 

Among a total of 27 studies investigating the effects of RF-EMR on the male reproductive system, negative consequences of exposure were reported in 21. Within these 21 studies, 11 of the 15 that investigated sperm motility reported significant declines, 7 of 7 that measured the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) documented elevated levels and 4 of 5 studies that probed for DNA damage highlighted increased damage due to RF-EMR exposure. Associated with this, RF-EMR treatment reduced the antioxidant levels in 6 of 6 studies that discussed this phenomenon, whereas consequences of RF-EMR were successfully ameliorated with the supplementation of antioxidants in all 3 studies that carried out these experiments. In light of this, we envisage a two-step mechanism whereby RF-EMR is able to induce mitochondrial dysfunction leading to elevated ROS production.

Radiofrequency radiation (900 MHz)-induced DNA damage and cell cycle arrest in testicular germ cells in swiss albino mice (2016); Molecular Cytogenetic Laboratory, Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics; Toxicology and Industrial Health

Subject Exposure
Male mice 900 MHz for 4 hours/day and 8 hours/day for 35 days

 

EMF exposure caused depolarization of mitochondrial membranes resulting in destabilized cellular redox homeostasis. Statistically significant increases in the damage index in germ cells and sperm head defects were also noted in exposure groups. Flow cytometric estimation of germ cell subtypes in mice testis revealed 2.5-fold increases in spermatogonial populations with significant decreases in spermatids. Almost fourfold reduction in spermatogonia to spermatid turnover (1C:2C) and three times reduction in primary spermatocyte to spermatid turnover (1C:4C) was found indicating arrest in the premeiotic stage of spermatogenesis, which resulted in loss of post-meiotic germ cells apparent from testis histology and low sperm count in exposed groups. Histological alterations such as sloughing of immature germ cells into the seminiferous tubule lumen, epithelium depletion and maturation arrest were also observed. To conclude, exposure-induced oxidative stress causes DNA damage in germ cells, which alters cell cycle progression leading to low sperm count in mice.

All these changes showed recovery following the post-exposure period indicating that the adverse effects of exposure are detrimental but reversible. 

Effect of low-intensity telephones on sperm quality: a systematic review and meta-analysis (2014)Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hatherly Laboratories, Prince of Wales Road, University of Exeter; Environmental International

Subject Exposure
10 in vitro and in vivo studies; 1,492 samples 2/3G mobile phones


Exposure to mobile phones was associated with reduced sperm motility
and viability, consistent across in vitro and in vivo, suggested that exposure to mobile phones negatively affects sperm quality.

 

 

 

 

Is there a relationship between cell phone use and semen quality? (2005); Andrology Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Szeged; Archives of Andrology

Subject Exposure
Humans 2/3G Mobile Phones


This study was conducted to determine a possible relationship between regular cell phone use and different human semen attributes. The history-taking of men in our university clinic was supplemented with questions concerning cell phone use habits, including possession, daily standby position and daily transmission times. Semen analyses were performed by conventional methods. Statistics were calculated with SPSS statistical software. A total of 371 were included in the study. The duration of possession and the daily transmission time correlated negatively with the proportion of rapid progressive motile sperm (r = -0.12 and r = -0.19, respectively), and positively with the proportion of slow progressive motile sperm (r = 0.12 and r = 0.28, respectively). The low and high transmitter groups also differed in the proportion of rapid progressive motile sperm (48.7% vs. 40.6%).

Conclusion: the prolonged use of cell phones may have negative effects on the sperm motility characteristics.

Image content influences men's semen quality (2005); Evolutionary Biology Research Group, School of Animal Biology (M092), The University of Western Australia; Biology Letters

Subject Exposure
Humans 2/3G Mobile Phones

 

Our analysis used an extensive survey to control for lifestyle factors that are known to influence semen quality. After other lifestyle variables had been accounted for in our analysis, storage of mobile phones close to the testes had a significant negative impact on sperm concentration and the percentage of motile sperm.

Conclusion: these trends suggest that recent concerns over long-term exposure to the electromagnetic irradiation emitted by mobile phones should be taken more seriously

Influence of 50 Hz magnetic field on sex hormones and other fertility parameters of adult male rats (2005)Department of Physics, University of UAE; Bioelectromagnetics

Subject Exposure
Adult male rats 50Hz sinusoidal magnetic field (e.g. near power lines) at approximately 25 µT for 18 weeks

 

A significant reduction in sperm count was observed in the exposed group.

Influence of 50 Hz magnetic field on sex hormones and other fertility parameters of adult male rats (2005)Department of Physics, University of UAE; Bioelectromagnetics

Subject Exposure
Male rats 50Hz power lines


In the exposed group, boundary tissue was found disrupted at various layers. The tissue showed infoldings, which were perhaps due to the loss of collagen and reticular fibrils from the inner and outer non-cellular layers. The outer non-cellular layer, which was thinner than that of the control, was stripped away from the myoid cell layer in multiple regions, giving a "blister-like" appearance. The myoid cells showed fewer polyribosomes, pinocytotic vesicles and glycogen granules. Most mitochondria were found to lack cristae. The connections between individual myoid cells were apparently lost. These results suggest that EMF exposure may cause profound changes in the boundary tissue of the seminiferous tubules. Therefore exposure to EMF may result in pathological changes that lead to subfertility and infertility. Of particular note, there were signs of recovery in the boundary tissue following withdrawal from EMF exposure. 

 

Evaluation of the effect of using mobile phones on male fertility (2007)